All Teeth Implant Replacement
FULL MOUTH DENTAL IMPLANTS
If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity.

In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures make it difficult to eat certain foods.

Implants are placed in the jaw as anchors for artificial teethHow will the implants be placed?
First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Then, over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These temporary healing caps, along with various connecting devices that allow multiple crowns to attach to the implants, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

New teeth will snap on and off round ball anchors There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Depending upon the number of implants placed, the connecting device that will hold your new teeth can be tightened down on the implant, or it may be a clipped to a bar or a round ball anchor to which a denture snaps on and off.

Full bridges or dentures attached to implantsFinally, full bridges or full dentures will be created for you and attached to small metal posts, called abutments, or the connecting device. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

Every case is different, and some of these steps can be combined when conditions permit. Your dental professional will work with you to determine the best treatment plan.

Implant Supported Partial Dentures

The removable partial denture (RPD) has had a long and successful track record in the prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous situations of the mouth. While fixed dental prostheses are preferred by patients as the treatment modality, due to the inherent lack of stability and retention of an RPD in comparison, many situations such as the distal extension scenario are routinely encountered where a fixed dental prosthesis cannot be provided to the patient. Dental implants have broadened the scope of traditional prosthodontic treatment; implant-supported fixed dental prostheses have successfully been used to rehabilitate the distal extension situation. However, anatomic limitations, such as proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve or the maxillary sinus, and financial constraints may preclude the placement of implants of sufficient dimensions to support a fixed dental prosthesis. It is in such situations that the RPD is indispensable for the prosthodontist.

The posterior distal extension scenario is an interesting one for a prosthodontist as it presents a number of design challenges. Distal extension RPDs are subjected to vertical, horizontal, and torque forces which compromise the stability and retention of the prosthesis.[1] The difference in compressibility and resilience of the periodontal ligament supporting the tooth and the mucosa overlying the edentulous alveolar ridge must be taken into account while designing the RPD to prevent accelerated alveolar bone/terminal abutment loss.[2]

The improved support to the distal extension RPD leads to a reduction in the tipping of the denture bases, resulting in improved performance of the prosthesis as well as maintaining the residual alveolar bone in an optimal state of health. The following case report describes the aforementioned approach toward the rehabilitation of such distal extension partial edentulous situations.
⦁ Implant Supported Over Dentures
Rehabilitating edentulous patients with residual ridge resorption has improved tremendously because of implant dentistry. Implant-supported overdentures have expanded rapidly as a successful treatment modality to rehabilitate completely edentulous patients. It improves retention, stability, function and esthetics as well as preserves the residual bone, especially in the mandible.[1]

Many denture-related complaints associated with conventional dentures can be addressed when dental implants are used to retain conventional dentures.[2] Overdentures are simply conventional dentures attached to the remaining teeth or dental implants.[3] Several studies have indicated that the use of implant-supported overdentures in the mandible is an effective treatment modality,[4],[5] especially in patients with excessive loss of residual bone.[6] The survival rate of implants in the front region of the mandible is excellent, and the rate of surgical complications is very low. Moreover, implants demonstrate a reduced rate of residual ridge reduction in the anterior mandibular area.[7] The treatment decisions depend on the patient’s individual needs and treatment modalities together with their economic realities.

The treatment of choice between fixed and removable implant-supported overdentures varies across cultures and countries. The literature suggests that patients who receive removable implant-supported overdentures have significantly higher satisfaction with their overdentures than those treated with fixed implant-supported prostheses.[8] Elderly people may have increased bone resorption, especially women after the age of menopause, and thus may have problems with denture use.[9]

In conventional complete dentures, continuous residual ridge resorption causes many problems including reduced retention, instability of dentures and soreness in the supporting mucosa owing to reduced denture-bearing area. The masticatory muscles in edentulous patients have diminished electromyographic activity and atrophy, which leads to weakened masticatory functional forces and reduced chewing.[10] The maximum biting force of complete denture wearers is reduced to approximately 20% of dentate patients’ biting forces. The reduced biting force alters masticatory functions because of inferior retention and stability of complete dentures. This will eventually lead to poor chewing ability in edentulous subjects

Implant Supported MALO Prosthesis

Malo Implant Bridge involving application of an occlusal screw-retained implant superstructure on the basis of the All-on-4 concept. The Malo Implant Bridge features a removable occlusal screw-retained superstructure; fabrication of the framework with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system allowing accurate adaptation; and use of the final tooth position model with guide temporary crowns allowing easy porcelain build-up and satisfying the patient’s esthetic concerns.
⦁ Immediate Implants

Immediate implant placement following tooth extraction has been found to be a viable and predictable solution to tooth loss. Minimally invasive surgical technique, lesser chairside and treatment time involved together with minimum post extraction complications, preservation of gingival aesthetics are a boon to the patient. However proper case selection, diagnosis and treatment planning, meticulous post-operative care preceded by a good surgical and prosthetic protocol are very essential for the long term success of the immediate implants.

Guided Digital Implant Placement

Both immediate implant placement and fully guided implant placement are becoming more popular options for surgical approaches. Combining the two is a win-win and allows a shortened treatment timeline while still maintaining complete control for the best restoratively driven placement. Dentists investing in new digital technologies in-house can predictably and quickly plan, design, and execute guided immediate implant surgeries where precision is crucial. Implementing a digital workflow can make implant surgeries more efficient, more profitable, and more predictable. Digital imaging technologies allow for unparalleled visualization and foresight, while in-house 3D-printing and CAD/CAM solutions bring the restorative portion under the same roof.

Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral scanning systems simplify treatment planning and help avoid surgical complications in advance. Rather than separating the surgical and restorative aspects of the treatment, combining the CBCT and the intraoral scan of the patient’s dentition leads to restoratively driven implant placement and makes the entire process more predictable.

Planning alone is only as good as the clinician’s surgical skills. Knowing the location of possible complications is a huge advantage, but using surgical guides further minimizes risk. Using the combined radiographs and models to design a surgical stent, which can be 3D-printed and used during surgery, and designing the surgical stent based on the planned ideal position on the computer from start to finish mean more control and confidence at the actual surgery. Bringing the digital placement of the implant into the operatory allows your surgeries to be performed with more control and confidence.

Placing the implant exactly as planned makes the restorative portion of the treatment very straightforward. In-office CAD/CAM systems allow the dentist to take digital impressions, design the final prosthesis, and fabricate it without outsourcing. This workflow is impressive to patients and is more efficient and cost-effective for the dental team. Often this process can even be accomplished during the day of surgery to further speed up the treatment timeline.

In conclusion, new digital technologies and techniques help establish an optimized workflow for in-house surgeries and restorations.

All Teeth Implant Replacement
FULL MOUTH DENTAL IMPLANTS
If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity.

In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures make it difficult to eat certain foods.

Implants are placed in the jaw as anchors for artificial teethHow will the implants be placed?
First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Then, over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These temporary healing caps, along with various connecting devices that allow multiple crowns to attach to the implants, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

New teeth will snap on and off round ball anchors There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Depending upon the number of implants placed, the connecting device that will hold your new teeth can be tightened down on the implant, or it may be a clipped to a bar or a round ball anchor to which a denture snaps on and off.

Full bridges or dentures attached to implantsFinally, full bridges or full dentures will be created for you and attached to small metal posts, called abutments, or the connecting device. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

Every case is different, and some of these steps can be combined when conditions permit. Your dental professional will work with you to determine the best treatment plan.

Implant Supported Partial Dentures

The removable partial denture (RPD) has had a long and successful track record in the prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous situations of the mouth. While fixed dental prostheses are preferred by patients as the treatment modality, due to the inherent lack of stability and retention of an RPD in comparison, many situations such as the distal extension scenario are routinely encountered where a fixed dental prosthesis cannot be provided to the patient. Dental implants have broadened the scope of traditional prosthodontic treatment; implant-supported fixed dental prostheses have successfully been used to rehabilitate the distal extension situation. However, anatomic limitations, such as proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve or the maxillary sinus, and financial constraints may preclude the placement of implants of sufficient dimensions to support a fixed dental prosthesis. It is in such situations that the RPD is indispensable for the prosthodontist.

The posterior distal extension scenario is an interesting one for a prosthodontist as it presents a number of design challenges. Distal extension RPDs are subjected to vertical, horizontal, and torque forces which compromise the stability and retention of the prosthesis.[1] The difference in compressibility and resilience of the periodontal ligament supporting the tooth and the mucosa overlying the edentulous alveolar ridge must be taken into account while designing the RPD to prevent accelerated alveolar bone/terminal abutment loss.[2]

The improved support to the distal extension RPD leads to a reduction in the tipping of the denture bases, resulting in improved performance of the prosthesis as well as maintaining the residual alveolar bone in an optimal state of health. The following case report describes the aforementioned approach toward the rehabilitation of such distal extension partial edentulous situations.
⦁ Implant Supported Over Dentures
Rehabilitating edentulous patients with residual ridge resorption has improved tremendously because of implant dentistry. Implant-supported overdentures have expanded rapidly as a successful treatment modality to rehabilitate completely edentulous patients. It improves retention, stability, function and esthetics as well as preserves the residual bone, especially in the mandible.[1]

Many denture-related complaints associated with conventional dentures can be addressed when dental implants are used to retain conventional dentures.[2] Overdentures are simply conventional dentures attached to the remaining teeth or dental implants.[3] Several studies have indicated that the use of implant-supported overdentures in the mandible is an effective treatment modality,[4],[5] especially in patients with excessive loss of residual bone.[6] The survival rate of implants in the front region of the mandible is excellent, and the rate of surgical complications is very low. Moreover, implants demonstrate a reduced rate of residual ridge reduction in the anterior mandibular area.[7] The treatment decisions depend on the patient’s individual needs and treatment modalities together with their economic realities.

The treatment of choice between fixed and removable implant-supported overdentures varies across cultures and countries. The literature suggests that patients who receive removable implant-supported overdentures have significantly higher satisfaction with their overdentures than those treated with fixed implant-supported prostheses.[8] Elderly people may have increased bone resorption, especially women after the age of menopause, and thus may have problems with denture use.[9]

In conventional complete dentures, continuous residual ridge resorption causes many problems including reduced retention, instability of dentures and soreness in the supporting mucosa owing to reduced denture-bearing area. The masticatory muscles in edentulous patients have diminished electromyographic activity and atrophy, which leads to weakened masticatory functional forces and reduced chewing.[10] The maximum biting force of complete denture wearers is reduced to approximately 20% of dentate patients’ biting forces. The reduced biting force alters masticatory functions because of inferior retention and stability of complete dentures. This will eventually lead to poor chewing ability in edentulous subjects

Implant Supported MALO Prosthesis

Malo Implant Bridge involving application of an occlusal screw-retained implant superstructure on the basis of the All-on-4 concept. The Malo Implant Bridge features a removable occlusal screw-retained superstructure; fabrication of the framework with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system allowing accurate adaptation; and use of the final tooth position model with guide temporary crowns allowing easy porcelain build-up and satisfying the patient’s esthetic concerns.
Immediate Implants

Immediate implant placement following tooth extraction has been found to be a viable and predictable solution to tooth loss. Minimally invasive surgical technique, lesser chairside and treatment time involved together with minimum post extraction complications, preservation of gingival aesthetics are a boon to the patient. However proper case selection, diagnosis and treatment planning, meticulous post-operative care preceded by a good surgical and prosthetic protocol are very essential for the long term success of the immediate implants.

Guided Digital Implant Placement

Both immediate implant placement and fully guided implant placement are becoming more popular options for surgical approaches. Combining the two is a win-win and allows a shortened treatment timeline while still maintaining complete control for the best restoratively driven placement. Dentists investing in new digital technologies in-house can predictably and quickly plan, design, and execute guided immediate implant surgeries where precision is crucial. Implementing a digital workflow can make implant surgeries more efficient, more profitable, and more predictable. Digital imaging technologies allow for unparalleled visualization and foresight, while in-house 3D-printing and CAD/CAM solutions bring the restorative portion under the same roof.

Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral scanning systems simplify treatment planning and help avoid surgical complications in advance. Rather than separating the surgical and restorative aspects of the treatment, combining the CBCT and the intraoral scan of the patient’s dentition leads to restoratively driven implant placement and makes the entire process more predictable.

Planning alone is only as good as the clinician’s surgical skills. Knowing the location of possible complications is a huge advantage, but using surgical guides further minimizes risk. Using the combined radiographs and models to design a surgical stent, which can be 3D-printed and used during surgery, and designing the surgical stent based on the planned ideal position on the computer from start to finish mean more control and confidence at the actual surgery. Bringing the digital placement of the implant into the operatory allows your surgeries to be performed with more control and confidence.

Placing the implant exactly as planned makes the restorative portion of the treatment very straightforward. In-office CAD/CAM systems allow the dentist to take digital impressions, design the final prosthesis, and fabricate it without outsourcing. This workflow is impressive to patients and is more efficient and cost-effective for the dental team. Often this process can even be accomplished during the day of surgery to further speed up the treatment timeline.

In conclusion, new digital technologies and techniques help establish an optimized workflow for in-house surgeries and restorations.

BOOK APPOINTMENT

Single Dental Implant Variables

If the teeth being replaced need to be removed, their extraction may be completed at the same time as the dental implant placement. This “one-stage” protocol can be followed when the tooth to be replaced has a single root and is not infected. Molars have at least two roots and usually require a “two-phase” treatment sequence. The two-phase sequence requires that the remaining roots are removed first and bone filled (grafted). The bone graft is allowed to heal for up to 12 weeks before the implant is surgically inserted in the second phase.

Anatomy:

Hybridge Treatment Protocols differ between the upper and the lower jaw due to their significant anatomic differences.

Upper Jaw – “Maxilla”

The bone in the area of the upper back teeth is limited by the location of the Maxillary sinus on both sides. Often after tooth loss, there may not be enough remaining bone to place an implant. When additional bone is required, a sinus lift bone graft may be necessary. If this procedure can be performed at the time of the implant surgery, the additional fee is limited to the material costs. The additional waiting time required is usually minimal. If the sinus lift bone graft must be done as a separate surgical procedure, the additional cost of materials to grow the bone is greater, as is the waiting time until the dental implant can be surgically placed (typically 4 months). Treatment Time: 4-12 months

Lower Jaw – “Mandible”

The back teeth area in the lower jaw sits above what is known as the mandibular nerve. As such, care is taken to avoid placing a dental implant too close to the mandibular nerve. CT scans are used to measure its location. This cutting-edge technology allows for pre-surgical computer planning, which minimizes the chance of complication or failure. Treatment Time: 2-6 months

Single Back Tooth

Description: Replacing a Single Back Toothis by far the most common tooth replacement scenario. Molars and pre-molars are usually the first teeth to be lost due to decay and gum disease. Thus, doctors at Hybridge Implant Centers have replaced thousands of Single Back teeth over the last 20 years. As with all aspects of implant dentistry, the time and efficiency of replacing back teeth makes it one of the most predictable dental procedures performed.

Research shows that 80% of chewing is done in the area of the first molar. The replacement of first molars should be seen as a high priority to maintain full function, with both bite and jaw stability. The second molars, on the other hand, are not nearly as important to good function, and in many cases are not replaced unless a patient feels the chewing surface is missed.

Single Front Tooth

Description: It has often been said that replacing a single front tooth can be one of the most challenging forms of tooth replacement. The determining factor is the level of prominence the tooth has in the smile, and the level of expectation that the patient has that the new tooth will look indistinguishable from the natural teeth around it.

Dental implants come in various sizes of length and width. Because front teeth are typically used for tearing food, using an implant of maximum size in this scenario is always preferred. Determining the exact jaw dimensions prior to implant surgery allows the implant team to decide on just the right implant for the tooth to be replaced.

CASES STUDY